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Category: degree (page 1 of 25)

Benefits of a College Education

Many high school students today are either dropping out of high school or are just not attending college because they do not know the benefits. The benefits of a college education are going to be discussed in this article and you should walk away wanting to go to college.

The biggest reason you should get a college education is because of the money. A college degree has been proven to pay more than those without. A survey was taken in 2003 and it showed that workers who had a bachelor’s degree were getting paid an average of $900 a week and those who graduated high school had an average $554 a week. That means that those with a bachelor’s degree are making $346 more a week than those with only a high school degree, or roughly a 60% jump in the average earning.

For those who are thinking about getting a job that does not require a college education you should find that it will still pay more if you do. Although you could get paid more you will probably find that you do not get many benefits such as health insurance with jobs that do not require a college degree.

The second benefit of a college education is the availability of jobs. Unlike previous generations the jobs being offered to those without a college education or even a high school diploma are dwindling. Jobs such as industrial jobs, trades, and skilled labor used to be prevalent before computer technology. Now jobs require a smaller workforce because of the technology.

The assembly line used to be a major part of why there were so many jobs in the different businesses but now those people are not required as much but rather there is a higher need for people in engineering, business administration, and management, and all those jobs usually require a college degree.

The final benefit of a college education is the types of jobs you will be able to do. There are many advantages for those who have a degree in science, manufacturing, and engineering fields. For example, those who want to work in science can now study highly specialized science degrees that work on environmental science and DNA analytics.

Not only will you be able to do almost any job if you get a college degree but you will also get the opportunity to explore jobs. This is perfect for those who do not know what they want to do for a career.

These are just some of the benefits of a college education and should be considered when you think about going to college.

Impact of Media on Learning

Abstract

Media has opened new dimensions in learning. Now education is no longer a constraint for anyone. Media has brought education to the doorstep of each and every individual. All forms of media- the newspaper, radio, television and the internet are equally important in imparting education. As the technology is progressing, the different educational modules are being channeled through certain community access centers like community radio system, televisions, internet, community multi-media centers etc. Media literacy or education does not only mean to be entertained by media but to learn something from it. As a major part of the learning process is concentrated on children, media plays a significant role to satisfy their intellectual curiosity. Children often learn important things through the media, which change their perspective to life. Moreover, radio has now started to enter into the educational sector commonly known as Community Radio System, which indirectly forms the part of e-learning process. Computer-based education has transformed the traditional offerings of distance learning. This medium of education converts the traditional static resources into interactive and interesting online modules for the learners. The primary motive of the Interactive Learning Modules is to create modular interactive learning materials for the development of education and to demonstrate their effectiveness in university curricula as well as industrial training programs. Interactive Learning Modules, which is another form of media, serves the purpose of both the technical and management corporate trainee people along with the people with learning disabilities. The main aim of this article is to focus on the positive effects of media on learning and how different forms of media have contributed to the development of mankind.

Media and learning: New dimensions
Author: Bipasha Chowdhury
Introduction:

Media is everywhere; it has become a part of our daily life. The media plays a dominant role in the learning process. Its impact is vast in shaping the life of an individual. Media has the potential to shape personalities, change the way we perceive and understand the world and our immediate reality. Though we know that all good things have both good and bad effects, likewise, media too have some positive and negative effects. Moreover, we have seen that a large number of people depend on the internet to collect information, read news, listen to music and download movies, play games and also for work. Newspaper, Radio, Television and the internet- all form part of the media and are important in imparting education. Media offers culture, sports, information, entertainment, current affairs and education. Sometimes the impact of media is very high. For example, children love to watch the superheroes and sometimes try to copy their actions while playing. On the other hand, the impact may not be so vast or immediate. It happens gradually as children see and hear certain messages repeatedly. Some of the devastating advertisements include: Fighting and unnecessary quarrel, cigarettes and alcohol being shown as the symbol of heroism, style and attractive, but not deadly and unhealthy. Moreover, violation of laws is shown …

Higher Ed Holdings Helps UTA Professors Expand Reach of Courses Online

Higher Ed Holdings Helps UTA Professors Expand Reach of Courses Online

Teachers Advance Careers with Accessible, Affordable, Online Degree Programs

By Dave Sorter

At the University of Texas at Arlington, administrators and faculty members are embracing online learning because of the way it fits students today.

“For us, it’s about meeting a need. It’s what students are demanding,” said Dr. Jeanne Gerlach, the university’s associate vice president of K-16 Initiatives and Dean of the College of Education. “Many students grew up using technology, and it’s the platform they want to use for their course work.  We see some students (in online courses) who are much more tech savvy than even we are.”

UTA has been at the forefront of online learning through its participation in the University of Texas System’s TeleCampus program, but it broadened its distance-learning offerings this 2008-09 academic year by partnering with Higher Ed Holdings to help distribute UTA’s College of Education and College of Nursing degree programs.

The Dallas-based company delivers the university’s courses through high-quality production and chat-room capabilities that facilitate discussion among students and instructors. It also funds student support services including academic coaching and student recruitment.

UTA’s new online offerings at the education college have begun attracting students in the first semester and enrollment is expected to grow significantly as the word spreads, Gerlach said. “On line options provide access to people who can’t make it to campus” she added. “The world is changing; we must change with it.”

Work and family life make an on-campus university program untenable for a lot of working teachers, said Dr. Ann Cavallo, a UTA professor who designs and supervises the online courses at the education college. Travel also is an obstacle, especially for someone who works full-time trying to negotiate rush-hour traffic to get to class. Distance learners, on the other hand, have the flexibility that comes with being able to time-shift their studies. They can watch the video presentations when they want, work their assignments around their schedules and join discussions and chat rooms at their leisure.

“The online platform makes it extremely accessible; a lot of teachers cannot take on-campus courses for a variety of reasons, but they are able to take them online,” Cavallo said.

Equally important is affordability – especially in an economic downturn such as the one we are currently experiencing.

The new 18-month online degree programs at UTA costs classmates $4,950. The cost would be about double that amount if they took the class on campus. And it’s even more of a bargain compared to for-profit providers like the University of Phoenix, which is three to four times more for a master’s in curriculum and instruction.

“That’s one of the beauties of these programs,” Gerlach said. “Students have had access issues, but affordability is a greater issue.”

According to Measuring Up 2008, a report by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, college tuition continues to outpace family income and the price of necessities such as medical …

Teach For America Reduces the Achievement Gap For Thousands of Students in Los Angeles Schools

After bidding adieu to the Bush era, many parents and concerned citizens experience lingering indignation toward the ineffectualness of the No Child Left Behind Act. Fortunately, institutions like Teach for America target twenty-nine urban and rural areas where educational inequality has hit the hardest. With only 45.3 percent of high school graduating seniors, the Los Angeles Metropolitan area is one of the nation’s most prominent regions of educational disparity. One of the goals of Teach for America is to ensure that a child’s birthplace does not determine his or her education and life prospects. For the 2008 school year, Teach for America has employed 350 teachers to alleviate the education gap in underserved schools in Los Angeles. As there has been a 42 percent increase in Teach for America applicants for the 2009 school year, Teach for America staff will continue to improve students’ performances in Los Angeles schools in 2009.

For applications due February 13th, Los Angeles candidates had the choice to sign up for several interview dates and locations throughout Los Angeles. Applicants signed up for interviews at three venues including McKinsey & Company in downtown Los Angeles. They attended interviews consisting of a five minute teaching presentation, problem solving activities, a group activity, and a personal interview. These rigorous evaluations were designed to provide interviewers with a way assess the dedication, preparedness, and stamina of future teachers and educational leaders in underfunded Los Angeles communities. Such communities include Baldwin Park, Compton, Los Angeles, Lynwood, and Pasadena.

In the five minute teaching presentation, applicants demonstrated their organizational aptitude and ability to teach key academic subjects. The subjects and grade levels chosen for five minute teaching presentations reflected the subjects taught most by corps members in LA , including: Secondary English, Secondary Science, and Secondary Math. To ensure successful funding for these grades and subject levels, twenty-eight percentage of Teach for America’s budget is used for corps member’s professional development. Twenty percent is devoted to pre-service training; eighteen percent for recruitment and selection; sixteen percent for national support; six percent for alumni support and development; and five percent is dedicated to local program administration.

Without support from corporate and public foundations, Teach for America would be unable to fulfill its increasing budget demands. The organization receives corporate and public support from such companies as The Ahmanson Foundation, The Eisner Foundation, MSST Foundation, The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, State Farm Insurance, Symantec Corporation, and The Weingart Foundation. These contributions make it possible for Teach for America to extend its services to new regions such as the Mississippi Delta and Greater New Orleans, in addition to expanding the corps’ population in Los Angeles.

You may wonder why Teach for America generates such a colossal impact on students’ lives. Why are so many organizations donating funds to support a non-profit organization when there are qualified teachers who already exist? Do schools in Los Angeles really need Teach for America or is the corps’ presence in Southern California superfluous, especially during a time …

Education in Pakistan

Education in Pakistan

Education in Pakistan is divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary School Certificate); and university programs leading to graduate (undergraduate) and advanced (post-graduate) degrees.

All academic education institutions are the responsibility of the provincial governments. The federal government mostly assists in curriculum development, accreditation and some financing of research.

Pre-school

A child may begin his/her schooling at a pre-school at the age of 3. Over the last few years, many new kindergarten (sometimes called montessori) schools have sprung up in Pakistan.

Primary Education

Formal education in Pakistan starts from around age 5. The first 5 years of school are referred to as Primary. Thereafter, the next 3 are referred to as Middle and the 2 after as Highschool.

Secondary Education

At the completion of Highschool or 10 years of schooling, students are required to sit for board examinations referred to as Secondary School Certificate examinations or more commonly as ‘Matric’. These are administered by area boards. Those that receive passing marks (normally 33%) on this examination are awarded a Secondary School Certificate or SSC. Students may then choose to undergo 2 years of additional schooling (offered both a school and some colleges) after which they sit for the Higher Secondary School Certificate (HSSC), more commonly referred to as ‘Intermediate’ exams. There is a wide choice of subjects that students can choose from during their ‘intermediate’ years many of which are technical subjects. Students normally read about 5 subjects in a chosen stream such as pre-medical, science, humanities, pre-engineering etc. and then sit for the Higher Secondary School Certificate exam in those subjects which are also administered by area boards. Those that receive passing marks (normally 33% of all subjects cummulative) are awarded a Higher Secondary School Certificate or HSSC.

Technical Education

Students can enter a plethora of technical institutes for technical certificates and degrees. The entrance requirements for these courses vary greatly with some such as carpentry requiring the applicant to be literate whereas others such as B.Tech in automation require HSSC.

Post-Secondary

Pakistani education system

Students can then precede to a College or University for Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Science (BSc) or Commerce/Business Administration (BCom/BBA) degree courses. There are two types of Bachelor courses in Pakistan namely Pass or Honours. Pass constitutes two years of study and students normally read three optional subjects (such as Chemistry, Mathematics, Economics, Statistics) in addition to almost equal number of compulsory subjects (such as English, Pakistan Studies and Islamic Studies) whereas Honours are three or four years and students normally specialize in a chosen field of study such as Biochemistry (BSc Hons. Biochemistry). It is important to note that Pass Bachelors is now slowly being phased out for Honours throughout the country. Students may also after earning their HSSC may study for professional Bachelor degree courses such as engineering (B Engg), …

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